Category Archives: Resources

When consensus-building is beautiful: Barrie Learning Commons has a special gift


 

They made a what? Teacher Caroline Leppanen from Hewitt’s Creek Public School in Barrie, Ontario delighted us with her learners’ amazing creativity in this inspiring report:

My grade 6 class spent a great deal of time inquiring about Truth and Reconciliation, First Nations circle teachings, Grandfather teachings, and residential schools. We have completed our Project of Heart! And are excited to share it with you!

We will hold a dedication ceremony in September.We have shared our process via Twitter @leppanens_world

Our plan? The table will be placed in our Learning Commons. It will be a place for groups to come when they need to arrive at a consensus. It will be a place for people to come when they are in need of a restorative session. Its tiles all tell a story of my students’ learning. They will share these stories at the dedication ceremony.

Editor’s note: We’ve add the Hewitt’s Creek photos to our albums page at https://www.flickr.com/photos/projectofheart/albums — it’s a great place to see how educators across Canada have incorporated POH tiles and artifacts in their classroom.

Central Algoma Secondary School Students Participate in Project of Heart

Earlier this week 38 students  Grade 10 students from Central Algoma Secondary School in Desberates, Ontario visited Algoma University to learn about the history of residential schools in Canada, the Shingwauk Indian Residential School, and Project of Heart.

The day opened with Survivor Mike Cachagee speaking with students about his experience attending three residential schools.  The students also spent time with Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre staff, and took a tour of the historic Shingwauk Site and participated in hands on reconciliation activities including Project of Heart.

Project of Heart a valuable resource for Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference


 
Two high school history teachers from the Ottawa Carleton District School Board recently brought Project of Heart to 60 students from across the National Capital area who had gathered to learn about genocide.

Kim Bruton and Amanda Anderson were presenting at the 3rd annual National Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference at Carleton University in Ottawa. Project of Heart was invited to be part of the day’s program in order to recognize the Indian Residential School era and the vast number of Indigenous children affected by Canada’s “hidden genocide” – a cultural genocide which was meant to “kill the Indian within the child”, and that all too often killed the child as well. Continue reading Project of Heart a valuable resource for Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference

Resource: Blanket Exercise Workshop

As someone who does a lot of work with students (of all ages) to teach them about residential schools I am always looking for hands on learning ideas relating to Indigenous history.

The Blanket Exercise Workshop developed KAIROS is a “teaching tool to share the historic and contemporary relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.”

The Exercise teaches Indigenous history and invites participants to take on the roles of Indigenous people in Canada through an interactive learning session. Standing on blankets that represent the land, they walk through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance. Participants are directed by facilitators representing a narrator and the European colonizers.

The Blanket Exercise website includes resource and edu-kit materials for both adults and children.  It also includes guidelines for educators wishing to facilitate their own workshop.  A great resource for those looking to introduce a hands on activity to teach about Indigenous history in Canada.

Resource: Indigenous Histories

In January 2016 Crystal Fraser guest edited a series of Indigenous history posts for ActiveHistory.ca.

The posts explored questions such as: What are the implications of sharing our research? How can we convey to readers that these are not ‘controversial issues’, but our lived experiences? What role should my own community play in my research? Where do I, as an Indigenous person, fit into academia – a system built and maintained on white privilege and settler colonialism?

This series of posts is a great resource for educators looking to learn more about Indigenous history and culture in Canada.  The complete series can be found here.

Resource: Ruby’s Story

Some of the most common questions we hear relating to residential schools education are: Why should we teach children about the history of residential schools? And how do we teach children about residential schools in a classroom setting?

Ruby’s Story, written as a blog post by âpihtawikosisân discusses the experiences of a present day First Nations student in Grade 2 when she decided to focus on residential schools for a class assignment.

Ruby’s Story is an excellent example of why it is important to learn and talk openly about residential schools at all education levels.

Truth and Reconciliation Resources for Teachers

The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto recently released a list of teacher resources relating to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

This list compliments the residential school resource list previously compiled by OISE.  The residential school resource list includes suggestions of books, videos, websites, and news articles for a variety of ages.

The newly developed reconciliation resource list is divided into three sections: articles, reports, and education resources.  It includes background information on the TRC, cultural genocide information, youth voices on reconciliation, and suggestions of classroom activities. The bulk of the information is geared toward high school and upper elementary school grades.

Educators planning activities around reconciliation might find the Kitchen Table Dialogue Guide, Community Action Tool Kit, and Reconciliation Dialogue Workshop Guide particularly useful.

The complete reconciliation resource list can be found by clicking here.