All posts by Evan

When consensus-building is beautiful: Barrie Learning Commons has a special gift


 

They made a what? Teacher Caroline Leppanen from Hewitt’s Creek Public School in Barrie, Ontario delighted us with her learners’ amazing creativity in this inspiring report:

My grade 6 class spent a great deal of time inquiring about Truth and Reconciliation, First Nations circle teachings, Grandfather teachings, and residential schools. We have completed our Project of Heart! And are excited to share it with you!

We will hold a dedication ceremony in September.We have shared our process via Twitter @leppanens_world

Our plan? The table will be placed in our Learning Commons. It will be a place for groups to come when they need to arrive at a consensus. It will be a place for people to come when they are in need of a restorative session. Its tiles all tell a story of my students’ learning. They will share these stories at the dedication ceremony.

Editor’s note: We’ve add the Hewitt’s Creek photos to our albums page at https://www.flickr.com/photos/projectofheart/albums — it’s a great place to see how educators across Canada have incorporated POH tiles and artifacts in their classroom.

Project of Heart a valuable resource for Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference


 
Two high school history teachers from the Ottawa Carleton District School Board recently brought Project of Heart to 60 students from across the National Capital area who had gathered to learn about genocide.

Kim Bruton and Amanda Anderson were presenting at the 3rd annual National Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference at Carleton University in Ottawa. Project of Heart was invited to be part of the day’s program in order to recognize the Indian Residential School era and the vast number of Indigenous children affected by Canada’s “hidden genocide” – a cultural genocide which was meant to “kill the Indian within the child”, and that all too often killed the child as well. Continue reading Project of Heart a valuable resource for Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference

Youth Reconciliation Leadership Forum

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CANADIAN ROOTS EXCHANGE

March 5-7, 2015

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA

A youth to youth interactive forum exploring how to bridge the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities in Canada. Hosted with Children of the Earth High School in Winnipeg, approximately 300 youth from across the country are anticipated to take part. The target age is for youth between the ages of 15 and 29.

For more information about registration, or presentation opportunities, go to http://canadianroots.ca/national-conference

Young leaders take the helm at Covenant Chain V


 

The events at at the Diocesan Centre in Ottawa on October 18th will go down as “making history” in Project of Heart’s diary.
 
For the first time at a Kairos Covenant Chain Link conference, youth took over the plenary and guided the delegates through a session given by Shannen’s Dream Team from the National Capital region. Seven area students​ spoke of their journey of activism, inspired by First Nation youth Shannen Koustachen of Attawapiskat. Continue reading Young leaders take the helm at Covenant Chain V

Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre

The Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre at Algoma University is pleased to announce that it will be acting as the Ontario host for the Project of Heart.  We look forward to working with groups across Ontario on this important and meaningful project.

The Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) is a recent integration and consolidation of two major initiatives of Algoma University (AU) and its partners, the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association (CSAA) and the National Residential Schools Survivors Society (NRSSS): the Shingwauk Project, founded in 1979; and the Residential School Research, Archive and Visitor’s Centre, founded in 2005.

The SRSC is a cross-cultural research and educational development project of AU, CSAA, and NRSSS. The founders of these decades-long efforts were joined together by their recognition of the profound importance of the commitment to the Shingwauk Trust and the relationship with Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples that AU assumed upon its relocation in 1971, in partnership with the Keewatinung Anishnabek Institute, to the site of the former Shingwauk and Wawanosh Indian Residential Schools.

For over three decades the SRSC and its predecessors have partnered with many organizations including the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, the Anglican Church of Canada, the Dan Pine Healing Lodge, Nishnawbe-Aski Nation, and others to:

  • research, collect, preserve and display the history of Residential Schools across Canada;
  • develop and deliver projects of “sharing, healing and learning” in relation to the impacts of the Schools, and of individual and community restoration; and
  • accomplish “the true realization of Chief Shingwauk’s Vision.”