POH at FNIYES National Science Camp

Algoma University’s was bustling last week as 40 Aboriginal students from across Canada participate in the 2016 First Nations Inuit Youth Employment Strategy (FNIYES) National Aboriginal Science Camp – Sault Ste. Marie, sponsored by Indigenous and Northern Affairs.

Students aged 12–15 from various provinces, who have demonstrated a keen interest in science and technology, took part in this one week camp. The camp helps First Nations and Inuit youth gain employment skills while also introducing them to new career paths and opportunities.

Students participated in a sacred fire ceremony with an elder and a visit to the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre to learn about the history of the Shingwauk and Wawanosh Residential Schools.  As part of this experience the students participated in Project of Heart and created wooden tiles as a gesture of reconciliation.

When consensus-building is beautiful: Barrie Learning Commons has a special gift


 

They made a what? Teacher Caroline Leppanen from Hewitt’s Creek Public School in Barrie, Ontario delighted us with her learners’ amazing creativity in this inspiring report:

My grade 6 class spent a great deal of time inquiring about Truth and Reconciliation, First Nations circle teachings, Grandfather teachings, and residential schools. We have completed our Project of Heart! And are excited to share it with you!

We will hold a dedication ceremony in September.We have shared our process via Twitter @leppanens_world

Our plan? The table will be placed in our Learning Commons. It will be a place for groups to come when they need to arrive at a consensus. It will be a place for people to come when they are in need of a restorative session. Its tiles all tell a story of my students’ learning. They will share these stories at the dedication ceremony.

Editor’s note: We’ve add the Hewitt’s Creek photos to our albums page at https://www.flickr.com/photos/projectofheart/albums — it’s a great place to see how educators across Canada have incorporated POH tiles and artifacts in their classroom.

Central Algoma Secondary School Students Participate in Project of Heart

Earlier this week 38 students  Grade 10 students from Central Algoma Secondary School in Desberates, Ontario visited Algoma University to learn about the history of residential schools in Canada, the Shingwauk Indian Residential School, and Project of Heart.

The day opened with Survivor Mike Cachagee speaking with students about his experience attending three residential schools.  The students also spent time with Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre staff, and took a tour of the historic Shingwauk Site and participated in hands on reconciliation activities including Project of Heart.

Project of Heart a valuable resource for Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference


 
Two high school history teachers from the Ottawa Carleton District School Board recently brought Project of Heart to 60 students from across the National Capital area who had gathered to learn about genocide.

Kim Bruton and Amanda Anderson were presenting at the 3rd annual National Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference at Carleton University in Ottawa. Project of Heart was invited to be part of the day’s program in order to recognize the Indian Residential School era and the vast number of Indigenous children affected by Canada’s “hidden genocide” – a cultural genocide which was meant to “kill the Indian within the child”, and that all too often killed the child as well. Continue reading Project of Heart a valuable resource for Day of Remembrance and Action on Mass Atrocities Youth Conference

POH at École secondaire catholique Jeunesse-Nord

Within the native spirituality unit for the grade 11 “World Religions” class, the students at École secondaire catholique Jeunesse-Nord in Blind River, Ontario discovered the history and the impact of the residential school system in Canada for First nations people of the pass and of today.

By listening to survivor’s testimonies and watching the documentary We were children, the group was overwhelmed by the injustice and abuse that occurred within these schools.

By creating the commemoration exhibit, the students hope to share their knowledge of the residential schools to their classmates and friends. Projet du coeur 2Projet du coeur

White Pines Students Learn about the Shingwauk Residential School

Earlier this week students from White Pines Collegiate and Vocational School in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario visited the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre.

During their visit the students spoke with residential school survivor Mike Cachagee, toured the historic Shingwauk grounds, and learned about truth and reconciliation in Canada.

The students also had an opportunity to decorate Project of Heart titles as a gesture of reconciliation.

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Resource: Blanket Exercise Workshop

As someone who does a lot of work with students (of all ages) to teach them about residential schools I am always looking for hands on learning ideas relating to Indigenous history.

The Blanket Exercise Workshop developed KAIROS is a “teaching tool to share the historic and contemporary relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.”

The Exercise teaches Indigenous history and invites participants to take on the roles of Indigenous people in Canada through an interactive learning session. Standing on blankets that represent the land, they walk through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance. Participants are directed by facilitators representing a narrator and the European colonizers.

The Blanket Exercise website includes resource and edu-kit materials for both adults and children.  It also includes guidelines for educators wishing to facilitate their own workshop.  A great resource for those looking to introduce a hands on activity to teach about Indigenous history in Canada.

Resource: Indigenous Histories

In January 2016 Crystal Fraser guest edited a series of Indigenous history posts for ActiveHistory.ca.

The posts explored questions such as: What are the implications of sharing our research? How can we convey to readers that these are not ‘controversial issues’, but our lived experiences? What role should my own community play in my research? Where do I, as an Indigenous person, fit into academia – a system built and maintained on white privilege and settler colonialism?

This series of posts is a great resource for educators looking to learn more about Indigenous history and culture in Canada.  The complete series can be found here.

Central Algoma Secondary School Students Experience Project of Heart

Recently students from Central Algoma Secondary School (CASS) participated in Project of Heart during a visit to the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre at Algoma University.

As part of their visit to the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre the students learned about the former Shingwauk school, took a historical site tour, listened to Survivor experiences, and participated in hands-on learning activities.

The students also had a chance to see the Project of Heart: Children to Children Art Installation by artist and residential school survivor Shirley Horn at Algoma University.  The students also  decorate their own Project of Heart tiles as a gesture of reconciliation while reflecting on the residential school legacy.

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Ontario's home for Project of Heart

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