Films/Videos

INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS STUDENT DOCUMENTARY

This is a short film created by Arnell Tailfeathers from the Blood Reserve sharing the history and inter-generational impacts of Indian Residential Schools as well as the telling of two experiences by two different family members who went through the school system.

EDUCATING OUR YOUTH from TRC – CVR on Vimeo.

 

I AM MORAL COURAGE

I Am Moral Courage” is a YouTube channel that features a playlist of short videos that share the stories of different people who have encountered a variety of issues surrounding human rights, racism, religion, sexual orientation and many others.  Listen to their stories and inspire your learners to stand up for what they believe in! Watch the preview below, or visit the playlist directly by clicking HERE.

I PROMISE

I Promise from Shaughnessy Park on Vimeo.

After Charlene Kantyluk and her grade 8 students learned about the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools and completed Project of Heart, the students felt as though they needed to do more. They came up with the idea of making a video.  They wanted to share what they learned, their wishes, their apologies and their promises.  They wrote the script and helped with the video taping and editing.  With only the support of one of Shaughnessy Park School’s staff members, many of the students filmed most of the video.

JUSTICE FOR ABORIGINAL PEOPLES – IT’S TIME
PSAC aboriginal activists explain the issues behind the union’s campaign for justice for Aboriginal people.


Ininiwag Dibaajimowag: Clayton Sandy – Generations of Change
Clayton Sandy is from Sioux Valley Dakota First Nation. Both of his parents attended residential schools and 6 of his older siblings attend Birtle residential school. He has been employed with the Manitoba Government for the past 33 years. His video is called ”Generations of Change”.

THE APOLOGY

by Henny Jack, Tru Rez, Kardboard Kid, Pete Nyce & MC Sage (chorus Ellen Gabriel speech)

  WHERE ARE THE CHILDREN?


Click HERE to see two videos entitled “WHERE ARE THE CHILDREN”, available in English and Inuktitut.

SHI-SHI-ETKO
WE WERE CHILDREN PANEL

As young children, Lyna and Glen were taken from their homes and placed in church-run boarding schools. The trauma of this experience was made worse by years of untold physical, sexual and emotional abuse, the effects of which persist in their adult lives. In this emotional film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed unflinchingly through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

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